Essay On The Nature Of Commerce In General

Introduction, by Henry Higgs
Previous Editions, by Henry Higgs
I.VII The Labour of the Husbandman is of less Value than that of the Handicrafts-Man
I.VIII Some Handicrafts-Men earn more, others less, according to the different Cases and Circumstances
I.IX The Number of Labourers, Handicraftsmen and others, who work in a State is naturally proportioned to the Demand for them
I.X The Price and Instrinsic Value of a Thing in general is the measure of the Land and Labour which enter into its Production
I.XI Of the Par or Relation between the Value of Land and Labour
I.XII All Classes and Individuals in a State subsist or are enriched at the Expense of the Proprietors of Land
I.XIII The circulation and exchange of goods and merchandise as well as their production are carried on in Europe by Undertakers, and at a risk
I.XIV The Fancies, the Fashions, and the Modes of Living of the Prince, and especially of the Landowners, determine the use to which Land is put in a State and cause the variations in the Market-prices of all things
I.XV The Increase and Decrease of the Number of People in a State chiefly depend on the taste, the fashions, and the modes of living of the proprietors of land
I.XVI The more Labour there is in a State the more naturally rich the State is esteemed
I.XVII Of Metals and Money, and especially of Gold and Silver
II.III Of the Circulation of Money
II.IV Further Reflection on the Rapidity or Slowness of the Circulation of Money in Exchange
II.V Of the inequality of the circulation of hard money in a State
II.VI Of the increase and decrease in the quantity of hard money in a State
II.VII Continuation of the same subject
II.VIII Further Reflection on the same subject
II.IX Of the Interest of Money and its Causes
II.X Of the Causes of the Increase and Decrease of the Interest of Money in a State
III.II Of the Exchanges and their Nature
III.III Further explanations of the nature of the Exchanges
III.IV Of the variations in the proportion of values with regard to the Metals which serve as Money
III.V Of the augmentation and diminution of coin in denomination
III.VI Of Banks and their Credit
III.VII Further explanations and enquiries as to the utility of a National Bank
III.VIII Of the Refinements of Credit of General Banks
"Richard Cantillon and the Nationality of Political Economy," by W. Stanley Jevons
"Life and Work of Richard Cantillon," by Henry Higgs

Essai sur la Nature du Commerce in Général (Essay on the Nature of Trade in General)

Henry Higgs, ed. and trans.
First Pub. Date
1730?
London: Frank Cass and Co., Ltd. 1959 Includes "Richard Cantillon and the Nationality of Political Economy," by W. Stanley Jevons (1881).
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Cover
Table of Contents
About the Book and Author
Introduction, by Henry Higgs
Previous Editions, by Henry Higgs
Part I
I.I Of Wealth
I.II Of Human Societies
I.III Of Villages
I.IV Of Market Towns
I.V Of Cities
I.VI Of Capital Cities
I.VII The Labour of the Husbandman is of less Value than that of the Handicrafts-Man
I.VIII Some Handicrafts-Men earn more, others less, according to the different Cases and Circumstances
I.IX The Number of Labourers, Handicraftsmen and others, who work in a State is naturally proportioned to the Demand for them
I.X The Price and Instrinsic Value of a Thing in general is the measure of the Land and Labour which enter into its Production
I.XI Of the Par or Relation between the Value of Land and Labour
I.XII All Classes and Individuals in a State subsist or are enriched at the Expense of the Proprietors of Land
I.XIII The circulation and exchange of goods and merchandise as well as their production are carried on in Europe by Undertakers, and at a risk
I.XIV The Fancies, the Fashions, and the Modes of Living of the Prince, and especially of the Landowners, determine the use to which Land is put in a State and cause the variations in the Market-prices of all things
I.XV The Increase and Decrease of the Number of People in a State chiefly depend on the taste, the fashions, and the modes of living of the proprietors of land
I.XVI The more Labour there is in a State the more naturally rich the State is esteemed
I.XVII Of Metals and Money, and especially of Gold and Silver
Part II
II.I Of Barter
II.II Of Market Prices
II.III Of the Circulation of Money
II.IV Further Reflection on the Rapidity or Slowness of the Circulation of Money in Exchange
II.V Of the inequality of the circulation of hard money in a State
II.VI Of the increase and decrease in the quantity of hard money in a State
II.VII Continuation of the same subject
II.VIII Further Reflection on the same subject
II.IX Of the Interest of Money and its Causes
II.X Of the Causes of the Increase and Decrease of the Interest of Money in a State
Part III
III.I Of Foreign Trade
III.II Of the Exchanges and their Nature
III.III Further explanations of the nature of the Exchanges
III.IV Of the variations in the proportion of values with regard to the Metals which serve as Money
III.V Of the augmentation and diminution of coin in denomination
III.VI Of Banks and their Credit
III.VII Further explanations and enquiries as to the utility of a National Bank
III.VIII Of the Refinements of Credit of General Banks
"Richard Cantillon and the Nationality of Political Economy," by W. Stanley Jevons
"Life and Work of Richard Cantillon," by Henry Higgs
Appendix A
Appendix B, Bibliography
Footnotes
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Description

Richard Cantillon is one of the key figures in the early history of economics. He was certainly not the first to think about economic problems, but he was the first to have clear insight into the way the economy functions as a system. He was arguably the first to structure a theory of how the economy works. In this sense he could be called the first real economist. Today, his ideas on population, determination of prices, wages and interest, the role of the entrepreneur, banking, and the influence of money supply on the economy are increasingly quoted and appreciated. This is a translation of the Essai sur la nature du commerce en general his only surviving work. It was circulated in manuscript form for many years after his death and was extremely influential, albeit not well known, at least throughout the eighteenth century. The Essay on the Nature of Commerce in General shaped the development of economics through its formative influence on Francois Quesnay and Adam Smith. It is a cornerstone upon which all subsequent economic theory has been built. Transaction is proud to breathe new life into this classic work as part of its distinguished series in economic theory and history.
In his new introduction, Anthony Brewer showcases Cantillon, the prophetic thinker, for a new generation of readers. This volume's broad-based appeal and great cultural import can no longer afford to be overlooked. Students of economic theory, intellectual historians, and sociologists will find this volume indispensable.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 188 pages
  • 188 x 244 x 18mm | 780.19g
  • 01 Sep 2001
  • Taylor & Francis Inc
  • Transaction Publishers
  • Somerset, United Kingdom
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 0765804999
  • 9780765804990
  • 1,088,871

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