Cover Letter Ending Regards

Final statement

The last paragraph of your cover letter should mention when and how you are reachable as well as that you would welcome an invitation for a personal interview. Emphasize that you will reach out to the company yourself in the next few days to ensure that your application has arrived. Having sent the application, you now have a reason to call there. During the phone call, ask whether references and/or additional certificates are required and build an immediate personal contact, preferably with the person responsible.

Short and sweet

  • When and how are you reachable?
  • You are looking forward to an interview.
  • You will call in the next few days to ensure that the application has reached.

Ending salutation

The ending salutation depends on whether the name of the contact person is known. ‘Sincerely’ (US) and ‘Yours sincerely’ (UK) are the most common greetings if you know the person’s name. If you do not, however, and have used the salutation, ‘Dear Sir or Madam’, then ‘Yours faithfully’ is the preferred ending salutation. Phrases like ‘With best regards’ must never be used here, as they represent a more colloquial style and are used in email.

Whether you should place a comma after the ending salutation will depend on whether you have placed a comma after the greeting.

Dear Mr. XY, ... Yours sincerely,
Dear Mr XY ... Yours sincerely

After the ending salutation, about four blank lines serve as placeholders for your signature, followed by your first and last names. In contrast to the CV, British and American cover letters are both signed.

Kurz und bündig

  • ‘Sincerely’ if the contact person is known
  • ‘Yours faithfully’ if the contact person is unknown
  • Comma after ending salutation if there is also a comma after the greeting

Appendix

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Love is in the air, but is it in your cover letter?

After you’ve written a couple of paragraphs about your work experience, skills, and enthusiasm for the job and company, it’s time to wrap things up. We’ve written about email sign-offs, but closing your cover letter comes with its own set of rules. Here are Grammarly’s best tips for signing off a letter to a potential employer.

Say Thanks

Nobody wants to hire an employee with bad manners. Make sure to thank the reader for his or her time with a brief sentence. “Thank you for your time and consideration” is standard, but if that sounds too formal, try changing the wording to reflect the way you normally speak. The cover letter is a great place to let your personality shine, so adapt the language to suit your style.

Contact Information and Call to Action

Don’t make the hiring manager’s job any harder than it needs to be. Include your contact information in the header of your letter and toward the end of the text. You should also add a “call to action,” a marketing term for a message that prompts the reader to do something such as clicking a link, signing up for a newsletter, or buying a product. In this case, you want the hiring manager to offer you an interview.

Example: “Please feel free to contact me at [phone number] or [email address]. I look forward to hearing from you soon.”

If you’re feeling especially bold, flip the script! Tell the hiring manager that you’ll be in touch soon to follow up on your application — but be courteous and respectful of their time.

Choosing the Best Valediction

Most letters begin with some kind of salutation or greeting, whether it’s “Yo Homes” or “To Whom It May Concern.” The closing of your letter  – formally known as a valediction – should mirror the tone of your opening salutation. The standard business letter etiquette dictates that you begin with “Dear [Mr./Ms. Manager],” and the most common closing is “Sincerely,” but that’s not your only option.

Thank You: A classic for a reason, you can’t go wrong with a simple expression of thanks.

Best/Kind Regards: A solid choice that conveys a warm, caring tone.

All the Best: A personal favorite, it subtly implies that the letter writer is the best. Not a bad subliminal message when you’re on the job hunt.

Respectfully: A little more reserved and formal than other choices, it’s a good choice for a more conservative hiring manager.

Cover letters are business documents, so you should avoid an overly friendly or familiar tone—even if you know the hiring manager personally. Obviously you wouldn’t sign off “Love,” but “Thanks” and “Cheers” are a little too casual for a cover letter. You should also steer clear of old-fashioned phrases like “Faithfully Yours.” According to Amy Levin-Epstein, writing for CBS MoneyWatch, you should “[c]hoose the sign-off that fits the industry — and your personality — the best.”

Remember, having all the right words won’t count for much if they’re misspelled or punctuated incorrectly. Grammar matters, so make sure you proofread multiple times. Read your work out loud, ask a friend, and run your work through a spelling and grammar checker before you send your letter.



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A self-proclaimed word nerd, Allison VanNest works with Grammarly to help perfect written English. Connect with Allie, the Grammarly team, and nearly FIVE MILLION Grammarly Facebook fans at www.facebook.com/grammarly. Google+ Profile

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